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including senator lindsey graham and congressman peter king. are we inching closer to some potential compromise. athena joan has been following the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> martin, with congress returning this weekend, not much public evidence of any real progress on a deal the avoid the fiscal cliff. folks here in washington are wondering if this week will prove a turning point for republicans and democrats. members of congress expressed optimism sunday about the prospects for reaching a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. a series of tax increases and spending cuts next year that could do serious damage to the economy. they also sounded warnings. >> we can and must get an agreement. otherwise i think first of all the markets are going to start reacting. >> it's not a done deal and not a certainty. if congress does nothing, which congress has gotten pretty good at doing these days, we'll go over the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: staffers have been working behind the scenes to find common ground to prevent across-the-board cuts lawmakers say should concern everyone. >> i think you shou
senator lindsey graham and also from new york congressman peter king responding to this idea and jumping on the bandwagon with chandliss. let's listen to that. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is avoid becoming broke and republicans should put revenue on the table. i want to buy down debt and create rates to cut jobs, but i will raise taxes for the good of the country only if the government will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge we signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. >> reporter: and so it's interesting to see now two more republicans decide maybe it's not such a good idea to stick to this pledge. we'll have to see if more people decide to follow suit on that side of the aisle, fredricka. >> so athena, the lawmakers at all optimistic that they'll be able to reach a deal in the next few weeks? >> reporter: i don't know about the next few weeks, fredricka. we heard a lo
. the pledge is not for life, but everybody who signed the pledge including peter king who tried to weasel out of it, shame on him as the new york sun said today. i hope his wife understands the commitments last a little longer than two years or something. the commitment from the pledge -- >> whoa, whoa. hang on. that was a bit below the belt, grover. >> if you think a commitment is not for as long as you make it for, the commitment for the pledge as peter king well knows when he signed it is that as long as you're in congress you won't rain in spending and reform government and rein is taxes. it's only as long as you're in the house or senate. if he stayed too long, that's his problem. you don't tell the bank, oh, the mortgage wasn't that a long time ago? if you make a commitment, you keep it. >> this pledge was first signed in 1986. >> by some people. of course, every two years people often re-sign it. they make statements on it. this is one of the people having doubts just two years ago made a public letter saying he would never support a deal that had any tax increases, only revenues stemm
is not for life. but everybody who signed the pledge, including peter king who tried to weasel out of it, shame on him as the new york sun said today, i hope his wife understands that commitments last a little longer than, than, than two years or something. >> and zoraida, there you have grover norquist -- >> weeks. >> -- of course, from the americans for tax reform throwing out some pretty strong political hyperbole. but the fact of the matter is, as you said, fiscal cliff, 35 days away, and as we've heard from a lot of economists, if congress can't fix this, then we're in a lot of trouble. we can be heading back into recession. >> mark preston live in washington, d.c. thank you for that. so even if democrats and republicans get a spending deal done in time to steer clear of the fiscal cliff, derer thompson says it won't necessarily cure the economy. the senior editor of "the atlantic" joins us live in the next half hour. he has an interesting perspective. >>> ambassador susan rice heads to capitol hill this morning to mend fences with three republican senators. john mccain, lindsey graham and
, ate days? >> yes, i do. it is interesting to me. lindsey graham peter king. they are all friends of ours. they are walk ago way from the pledge. i don't see what this hysteria. i can't pick up a newspaper and not see anybody blamie inine ii. this is ignoring any issues. i don't understand how the media plays this game. we made a commitment to the base that elected us. we said to the voters we will keep taxes low and not increase taxes. how dare anyone else keep us to the promises that got us ele elected. that the moment these people are are primed. they are going to be reaganites. the moment that they are challenged. >> i can tell you this. not one drop of revenue should be put on the table until we have massive across the board spending reductions and entitlement reform. that is what is missing. the gop should stand up and say not one drop of revenue until you show me good faith with the spending reduction you all talk about except when it comes time to do something about it. and step b is that the small business community should say not one pens penny until i know you are not g
goes on the record by name dismissing his pledge and his power. peter king says a pledge is good at the time you sign it. in 1941 i would have voted to declare war on japan. but each congress is a new congress and you can't have a rule that you're never going to raise or lower taxes. i don't want to rule anything out. senator of georgia said, i'm frankly not concerned about the norquist pledge. senator john mccain said fewer and fewer people are signing this "pledge." it's actually a pledge, but any way. senator coburn called it "a tortured vision of tax purity." and it did you want end there in that article. bill crystal said this. >> let's have a serious debate. don't scream and yell when one person says, it won't kill the country if we raise taxes on millionaires. i don't understand why republicans don't take obama's offer. >> a calmist at the national review wrote, as a matter of political strategy not to say survival, republicans will have to agree to raise taxes on those defined as rich. republicans must also contend with the pew poll that asked who would be more to blame i
carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'll here from representative gregory meeks this morning as we check in on some of the hardest-hit victims of hurricane sandy and see how they offered thanks this weekend while surrounded by destruction. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." with david gregory. >>> president obama doing his part for the economy over the weekend out holiday shopping as part of small business saturday, picking up several children's book at an independent bookstore iypÑarlington. >>> meanwhile, uncertainty in the middle east. more clash
the case may be and so peter king didn't invent that. >> that's something that grover was rebuffed. you can opt out. >> once you're in, that's it. >> yes. >> but look, the big good news for progressives here, there are two fundamental values that have driven the economic conversation for republicans in this era. one is deficit is the biggest problem. here we are with the cliff, the curve, whatever you want to call it and what do we find out? even republicans are warning they don't want to go over the cliff because guess what? just cutting the deficit without any regard to the rest of our priorities is a bad idea. it happens to be the heart of republican economic policy and the other thing about never raising taxes, guess what? we don't have the gdp to seniors ratio than we did 20 years ago, so if we're going to be serious about an ageing population, it means you can't stick to these fantasies. >> i remember two years ago on the show, introducing him to the audience and explaining he's the most powerful republican in government and i had to do this long thing on who he is. and now, here he i
and bob corker in the senate and peter king in the house, they haven't said overall now we changed our tune, we're in favor of raising taxes, what they said is okay, maybe we will budge on tax increases of some form in exchange for some cuts to entitlements and things like that. so that's clearly a major difference in their stance. there is going to be a lot of tough negotiating that goes on here. no question about it. but the thing that has changed is the republicans are beginning to signal they will accept tax increases as part of some kind of deal to solve this fiscal cliff problem and start dealing with the $16 trillion debt. >> so you brought up some of the names. where do you seat republican party right now? are they beginning to line up behind the bob corkers and the saxby chambliss and lindsey graham willing to talk about new taxes on the wealthy, or is the party still, like, say, rand paul, i talked to him a short time ago. take a listen. >> -- willing to raise taxes when we're still spending $300,000 a year on robotic squirrels to watch rattlesnakes attack a robotic squirrel
question is all concerns around senators lindsey graham, saxby chambliss, congressman peter king among other republicans who said they'd be willing to break away from grover norquist's anti-tax pledge. will you say if you're willing to break that pledge in order to save the country from the fiscal cliff. >> hello, thomas. and first of all, i signed that pledge two years ago, and the reason i signed it is because i think increasing tax rates, increasing the amount of money that the federal government takes away from job creators is going to harm economic growth and economic growth is the number one component to a solution. what all these senators are saying is they'll take a look at their pledge only if the president puts forward his plan. how is he going to close the other part of that deficit? you know, his proposal right now, the most he can say would raise would be about $68 billion when our deficit last year was $90 billion. what is the president's plan for closing the additional additional $1 trillion worth of deficit? i think that's incumbent on the president to put forward his p
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10